Issue Five Call for Submissions

We are now accepting submissions for Issue Five of Project. Submissions are due Monday, May 25th, with the issue set to be released late summer/early fall 2015. Please refer to the submissions page for guidelines on content and format.

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Issue Four LA Launch Party

Please join us in Los Angeles to celebrate the launch of the new issue of Project at 2426 W. Washington Blvd. on Saturday, March 14th, from 6pm to 9pm. Refreshments will be served and issues of the journal will be available for sale.

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Issue Four now available for pre-order

Issue Four is now available for pre-order! Get your copy here. Issue Four of Project features Andrew Atwood, Erin Besler, Miroslava Brooks, E2A Architects, Ensamble Studio, David Eskenazi, Stephen Froese, Andrew Holder, Florian Idenburg & Jing Liu (SO-IL), Sylvia Lavin, Andrew Leach, Michael Meredith, Kyle Miller, Mark Rakatansky, Austin Smith & Dan Taeyoung, Samuel Stewart-Halevy, Luke […]

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Issue Three Launch Party

Please join us to celebrate the launch of the new issue of Project at common room, 465 Grand St., New York, NY on Wednesday, April 9, from 7pm to 9pm. Refreshments will be served and issues of the journal will be available for sale.

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Issue Three now available for pre-order

Issue Three is now available for pre-order! Get your copy here. Issue Three of Project features John Capen Brough, common room & Kim Förster, Reinier de Graaf, Neil Denari, Edward Eigen, Formless Finder, Adam Fure, Suzanne Lettieri & Michael Jefferson, Alexandra Leykauf, John May, Magnus Nilsson, Valerio Olgiati Architect, Pezo von Ellrichshausen, Lateral Office, Jill Stoner, […]

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Archizines

Project is featured in the Archizines traveling exhibition, curated by Elias Redstone. Visit the Archizines website for current and future exhibition locations and dates.

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Mark’s House

“Mark’s House,” by the firm Two Islands, is the winning entry in the Flint, Michigan Flat Lot Competition. The architects’ submission included seductive renderings of the proposed design: a mirrored, floating abstraction of a Tudor house. Then the project was built and, sadly, the reality was far from the glossy beauty portrayed in the initial […]

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Reading of Proposal for a Museum

What type of “reading” is appropriate for this type of image, encountered on the website Archive of Affinities, nearly devoid of context? Cursory formal analysis yields minimal results: a tower made of casually stacked, differently skinned blocks, each covered by a green roof. But the image is too flippant to be taken straightforwardly. It seems […]

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Objects and Subjects

Architecture, as a way of thinking, requires something outside of itself. It requires something to think about. The point is simple enough, though it seems that, because of the incessant pressure towards the production of a tangible, built object, architects have become more likely to lose sight of architecture’s fundamental capability to evaluate subjects. This […]

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On Crate Digging

“Crate diggers” are a peculiar species of modern consumer, endlessly and omnivorously searching for the obscure, the unusual, and the overlooked. They exhibit incredible patience, a keen eye, and an absence of expectation in their compulsive pursuit of forgotten vinyl treasures. It would be impractical and unrealistic to seek out a single desired LP when […]

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BIG Joke

With what framework can one evaluate the projects of Bjarke Ingels Group? They seem too casual, too whimsical for serious criticism. Their design process puts such great emphasis on the authorship of each project that the final products cannot be judged based on their forms alone. Instead, the forms are inextricably paired with their design […]

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Interiors I (Nutcracker)

Most of the way down the chronologically ordered spiral of Choices, the John Chamberlain retrospective now on view at the Guggenheim, you might find yourself leaning against the white balustrade of the ramp in front of a sculpture like Nutcracker—an early, seemingly modest piece that pulls you out of your museum drift before you know […]

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A Brief Theory of the Architectural B-side

An architectural B-side is, clearly, not an architectural hit. While an architectural B-side is surely architectural, its placement within the discipline may not be quite familiar or easily classified.  Such difficulty in categorization puts an architectural B-side on the disciplinary sidelines. It is precisely this peripheral positioning that affords the architectural B-side the ability to […]

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Stranger Than Fiction

“The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me.” Blaise Pascal, Pensées An empty space can feel foreboding, unsettling. When a plaza, a space typically of the people, is found empty, it can produce a sense of anxiety. This anxiety has been identified as a form of agoraphobia, a condition exclusive to modern urban dwellers. […]

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Architecture Will Make You Go Blind

Section. Sex-tion. Sex can be projected onto nearly anything, even (maybe especially) architecture. And this is not simply a product of perpetually having our minds in the gutter; often the innuendo is less than subtle. Towers, solid-void relationships, the earlier works of Gage/Clemenceau Architects (to name but a few of many culprits) all provoke thoughts […]

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Milstein Hall as ‘Miracle Box’

While Rem Koolhaas, in the essay “Junkspace,” compares contemporary architects’ understanding of the significance of modernism to “reading a footnote under a microscope hoping it [will] turn into a novel,” he has built a career out of assembling and recombining canonical Modernist tropes with the dirty realism of the built world. In many of Koolhaas’s […]

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Estrangement

Perhaps more than any other transformation exerted by the computer, the immediate coordination of orthographic projections (plan, section, elevation, axonometric, etc.) has had the greatest effect on architecture. Building Information Modeling is, in fact, so good at correlating projected views with each other that the automatic production of drawings is by now hardly a novelty […]

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Architecture Untreated

Architecture is crazy. Not wild or awesome or amazing crazy, but I’m-afraid-to-introduce-you-to-my-mother, you’re-suffering-from-a-diagnosable-disorder crazy. As a discipline architecture has committed itself to engaging all-at-once with three-dimensional reality and two-dimensional abstraction (in varying proportions depending on who you ask). As a result, it has had to simultaneously address two modes of representation that often find themselves […]

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Appearing Adaptable

Kenzo Tange’s metabolist icon, the Yamanashi Press and Broadcasting Building, stands tall in the low-lying valley town of Kofu, Japan. Unlike many metabolist projects that have struggled to adapt to changing twenty-first century environments, Yamanashi has aged well.  Built in 1967, the project underwent an extensive addition to accommodate the need for more space in the […]

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Against Smoothness

This is not ‘Michael Bay Finally Made An Art Movie, Part Two.’ But once again, the technical virtuosity of Michael Bay’s Transformers: Dark of the Moon leaves us with something to talk about. Setting aside the broader history of architecture and animation, Dark of the Moon embodies an emerging position in digital architecture: it is […]

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Mutations

Amidst the vast quantities of anonymous and unremarkable modernist architecture—especially large-scale housing—that are distributed throughout the twentieth-century city, there appear occasional exceptions, aberrations, and mutations that, despite the obscurity of their origins, offer important lessons on the potentials of architectural and urban form. These works of what we might call the modernist vernacular do not […]

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Opaqueness

At least since Colin Rowe and Robert Slutzky’s “Transparency” essays, for which a conspicuously unmentioned precedent can be found in Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion, architects have understood that transparency does not necessarily equal transparency. The familiar argument suggests that so-called “phenomenal transparency” — a strange title, if only because it has little to […]

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